Articles Of Agreement Springfield Massachusetts 1636 Dbq

The New England and Chesapeake colonies, both founded by England and mainly populated by the English, were very different colonies in the 1700s. This is explained by differences in geography, religion, and funding, as well as the types of settlers who emigrated to each colony The Chesapeake and New England colonies, although both on the east coast, had very different geographic characteristics. Virginia and the surrounding Chesapeake were made up of swampy marshes and swamps, as well as numerous rivers that were to lead to the largest mouth of the United States, the Chesapeake Bay (Document G). Although settlers in the area initially tried to find gold, they soon discovered that the land was more suitable for agriculture. This has allowed the region to wage a stronger conflict. The New England and Chesapeake colonies were separated in the areas of geography, religion, foundation, and the types of people who settled and lived there. Despite the fact that they had the same metropolis, these differences resulted in the two regions being two distinct societies. When this failed, the settlers switched to commercial agriculture, especially tobacco growing, after its introduction by John Rolph. These differences in foundation had a direct impact on the types of people who emigrated out of the metropolis to live and work in the colonies, the last difference between the New England and Chesapeake colonies. . .

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